Pages

In order to make a content translatable the translation blocks should be used, below you can find several examples of using translation strings in different page types:

Markdown

# {about-us[Heading about us] About Us}
{about-us-p1[First paragraph of in  About Us section] My awesome <em>source text</em> goes here}
{about-us-p2[Second paragraph of in  About Us section] Another awesome <em>source text</em> goes here}

HTML

<h1>{about-us[Heading about us] About Us}<h1>
<p>{about-us-p1[First paragraph of in  About Us section] My awesome <em>source text</em> goes here}</p>
<p>{about-us-p2[Second paragraph of in  About Us section] Another awesome <em>source text</em> goes here}</p>

ejs

<%
const paragraphs = ["My awesome <em>source text</em> goes here", 
                    "Another awesome <em>source text</em> goes here"]
%>
<% for (let i = 0; i < paragraphs.length; i++) { %>
  <p>{about-us-p<%= i +1 %>[<%= i +1 %> paragraph of About Us section] <%- paragraphs[i] %>}</p>
<% } %>

Reusing IDs

Early defined stringId in the page can be used in multiple places, that's possible by referencing to the stringId inside of the braces, ex:

<p>
  {stringId[Description] My awesome <em>source text</em> goes here}
</p>
<div>
  {stringId}
<div>

Heading IDs in markdown

Markdown headers are automatically getting ID set to them, for the future reference and TOC generation, whenever a translation string is used as a markdown heading element text translation StringID is used as a header ID, considering the example below:

# {about-us[Heading about us] About Us}

Actual HTML output of the markdown above will be:

<h1 id="about-us">About Us</h1>